An analysis of the topic of the hero antigone and creon

Creon ironically says this to the Counsellors before he tells them his first law, forbidding the burial of Polyneices.

An analysis of the topic of the hero antigone and creon

Divine Law The play opens with the debate between the sisters Antigone and Ismene about which law comes first—the religious duty of citizens, or the civil duty?

In the play “Antigone”, Sophocles at first portrays Creon as a just timberdesignmag.com has good, rational reasons for his laws and punishments. By the end of the play Creon’s hubris, or excessive pride, has taken over him, which leads to his demise. Sophocles' Antigone - Creon's Flaws - Antigone: Creon's Flaws In the play Antigone, I choose Creon to be the tragic hero because he is the King of Thebes and he looses everything he has. The Tragic Hero in Antigone; The Tragic Hero in Antigone. or any similar topic specifically for you. Do Not Waste With this being stated, the definition of a tragic hero is best supported by King Creon in Antigone. His downfall is caused by his incredible amount of pride, his tragic flaw, and he arouses our pity and fear because he.

Antigone invites Ismene to join her in burying their brother Polyneices, though the king has forbidden burial on pain of death. Antigone denies that Creon has authority in the matter of burial, a sacred duty she feels bound to fulfill.

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Creon, on the other hand, believes the state is supreme. He says to the city counselors: Furthermore, since he represents the city-state of Thebes as its king, his will is sovereign. They point out here that the two laws are in conflict—civil and religious.

Tragedy is bound to occur when these two vital laws are set against one another, for both sacred law and civil law are necessary for the welfare of the people. The gods also weigh in through omens, and the prophesy of the seer, Teiresias.

He proves by example the will of the gods overrides human law. An early choral ode praises the wonders of human accomplishment: On the other hand, humans seem limited by their mortality and their fate, or predetermined destiny.

Someone like Oedipus, born with a certain prophesied fate, is not able to circumvent it by any means. Creon, however, seems to suffer through his own choices and stubbornness. Creon feels confident that through his will, he can make laws for the city of Thebes, and at first he sticks by his decision to punish Antigone.

Together the fates were called the Moirae, the ones who apportioned human destiny. In early Greek literature, Fate was all-powerful, even more powerful than the gods, for even Zeus did not know when his reign would end.

Sophocles and the later philosophers like Plato, however, tried to balance the picture by glorifying human reason as an echo of the reasoning intelligence behind cosmic law.

An analysis of the topic of the hero antigone and creon

Humans could thus modify their own destiny if they were wise. For this world came into being from a mixture of Necessity and Intelligence. Intelligence controlled Necessity by persuading it for the most part to bring about the best result, and it was by this subordination of Necessity to Reasonable persuasion that the universe was originally constituted as it is.

Fate still is powerful in this view, but more so where humans are arrogant and blind. The purpose of tragedy then is to show how humans bring fate down on themselves. There is usually more than one choice available, and the tragic hero makes the wrong choice, as in the case of Creon.

Antigone, however, is entangled in a legacy of fate that plagues everyone in the family of Oedipus. Her destiny seems more set and less her fault, though she does brings it down on herself by rebelling against Creon.

She could have chosen as Ismene did. In tragedy, Fate usually has the upper hand, because tragedy highlights the limitations of humans when they overreach, and when they do not possess wisdom. When Antigone is led away to her death the Chorus sings: Power Sophocles, like Shakespeare, includes political discussions in his plays that are important topics for the audience.

What would the ideal ruler be like? Creon is king and in an early speech to the city elders the Chorushe explains how he will be a tough ruler because of his loyalty to Thebes. He will not let partiality or family connections dictate over the good of the city: He then tries to prove his tough impartiality by denying burial rites to his own nephew, Polyneices, who was a traitor to Thebes.

Creon then sets guards around the body. The Chorus does not defy Creon as Antigone does, but they do give feedback to him at critical points.

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Creon sees her as a rebel, a threat to his power: Antigone is more of a threat than a man would be, for she has the status of a slave in Thebes, and he calls her a slave lines A woman should not be seen or heard.

If he gives in to her, he is doubly shamed. First, she is a relation, and it would seem like giving special favors.The Regrets of a Time Gone By - The Regrets of a Time Gone By Poetry is a language of understanding.

The reader must be able to comprehend the various known connotations for words as well as be able to pick up on the uncommon and unknown meanings of words. Antigone, the tragic hero who defies Creon in order to give her brother a proper burial. Creon, a tyrant who abuses his power and loses his family.

Haemon, Creon's son, who commits suicide at the. In the story Antigone, Creon shows all of the characteristics of a tragic hero. He receives pity through the audience, yet recognizes his weakness, and whose downfall comes from his own self-pride.

Though the audience notices how . Definition. English novelist E. M. Forster described plot as the cause-and-effect relationship between events in a story. According to Forster, "The king died, and then the queen died, is a story, while The king died, and then the queen died of grief, is a plot."Consider the following: The prince searches for Cinderella with the glass shoe; Cinderella's sisters tried the shoe on but it does.

Antigone - Creon Defines the Tragic Hero Antigone, written by Sophocles is a tale of a tragic hero who suffers with the recognition and realization of his tragic flaw. Although this short story is titled after Antigone, Creon is the main character and he provides the moral significance in the play.

In the play “Antigone”, Sophocles at first portrays Creon as a just timberdesignmag.com has good, rational reasons for his laws and punishments.

By the end of the play Creon’s hubris, or excessive pride, has taken over him, which leads to his demise.

Antigone - Creon as a Tragic Hero Essay Example For Students | Artscolumbia